Behind the Brand: Remember Collective

Team Rider Brenda Souza getting low and throwing it sideways in Brazil.

Founded  2013 
Based Costa Mesa, CA
Disciplines Downhill/Freeride, Dancing/Freestyle
Website remembercollective.com

If you asked any of the hundreds of brands in skateboarding why they got in the game, most would say ‘for the fun of it.’ While doing it for fun seems like the intrinsic answer, few companies truly live up to the claim like Remember Collective. In fact, almost no other brand can claim that even their namesake is centered around the pursuit of ‘remember’ing the good times spent hanging out with friends. Likewise, no other brand has a reputation for creating products centered around the idea of having fun in quite the same way that Remember Collective does.

If you live for the satisfaction of coring wheels like Mateus Marinho's setup here, Remember Collective's are the ones for you. 

The history of the brand starts at a time when an abundance of different deck shapes, designs and concaves seemed to be matched with an equally abundant amount of meet-ups and events to test them out at. These events created the perfect environment for the crew behind Remember Collective to better their free ride skills and further immerse themselves in the tech slide community. In doing so, they were able to get a firsthand glimpse at a massive quality control issue from one of the more established free ride wheel brands at the time and capitalize on the opportunity. 

The 70mm Remember Collective Savannah Slammas with 80a urethane.

With their work cut out for them, the crew began down the path of creating a wheel brand with the initial intentions of creating the best looking and most enjoyable, slide-enabling wheels on the market. To further their efforts, they hit the hills with a combination of different core and urethane samples and began funneling down what the riders at these events liked and what would be feasible to create. This bout of product development was responsible for creating the Hoot and Pee Wee wheels. Designed to compliment one another, the capabilities of these wheels provide a viable option no matter which board the rider decides to draw from their quiver.

The smooth operator himself, Abou Seck, keeping things balanced under the lights. 

Serving as the longboarding free ride wheel, the Hoots generate an unmatched sliding experience with a 38mm contact patch surrounded by beveled lips and bound by a centerset core placement. Conceived to enable both the ability to control and ability to slide simultaneously, the soft urethane of the Hoots were designed to be the go to free ride wheel for maximizing maneuverability on boards longer than 34-35 inches.

On the other hand, the Pee Wees were created for non-drop through boards shorter than 34-35 inches, including long double kicks, single kicks with street concave and beyond. With the aim for these wheels to be the go-to for more tech oriented slides, their stoneground finish and rounded lips allow these wheels to hit the streets straight out of the packaging. 

The 62mm Remember Collective Pee Wees with 82a urethane.

Finally, with the graphics and colors for both sets of wheels aligned with the brand’s ideals of inclusivity and fun, the Hoots and the Pee Wees hit the market as a testament to Remember’s promise of bringing quality and variety to the scene. 

As one would imagine, the progression for growth for a company rooted in fostering openness and positive vibes was largely supported by the same events that provided their initial inspirations. As they began taking the new product to the community, they picked up riders like Nick Li to not only support the brand but to join the team on the back end. Reflecting on his first impression of the wheels, Li recalled,

“They were like nothing else. There were no wheels like Remember’s on the market at the time and I still don’t think there’s any quite like it: something that slid that long but would last a month instead of a week, plus they were cheaper and had thane lines.”

Scott Merkley out there hunting hills and seeking corners.

In time, riders like Li went from sampling the wheels to selling them at events and spreading trusted word of mouth within the scene that Remember Collective stood up to the test. As a small business, their efforts began and are still largely centered at the grassroots level. Though they may not sponsor events where sponsorship package are in the thousands, Remember has more than made up for it in their devotion to supporting local events, whether hosted by shops or individual scene supporters. Endemic of their wheel constructions, they prioritize their support around the non-competitive slide jams and free ride events. In the process of hustling on the hills, a the quick launch of a Facebook page sparked a social media following for the brand, supported by an outpouring of positive user reviews and shares.

The 65mm Remember Collective Lil Hoots with 74a urethane.

Roughly six years in, the value to customers and retailers that Remember Collective has been able to secure has earned them a spot as one of the premier wheel brands for the majority of the communities most influential shops. What began in California naturally blossomed across borders and continents to help Remember spread across worldwide, where their presence is not only felt by shops but also by the sponsored riders they support.

Abou Seck staying on the straight and narrow.

Though obviously concerned with the skill level of their riders, they are perhaps more intrigued by those who look like they are having a good time and make an effort to spread the stoke within their local scene so others can enjoy as well. This way, the guys behind Remember Collective can hope to continue spreading their influence and reminding skaters everywhere to remember the golden days and strive to create more of them. 

Still got questions? In case we missed anything here or you had general skate-centric comments, questions or concerns you’d like us to handle, feel free to shoot us a message here 


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